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Pure Motivation » General Discussion » Health and Wellness/ الصحة و اللياقة » Lowering Cholesterol

Lowering Cholesterol

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1 Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:29 pm

zaharah

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This is a slideshow of foods that are proven to help lower Cholesterol. Just simple changes will help.

Link:
http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/slideshow-lowering-cholesterol?ecd=wnl_hyp_021810
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ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

2 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:30 pm

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Cholesterol is a type of fat called a lipid. The body uses it for many things, such as making new cells. Your liver makes the cholesterol that your body needs. You also get cholesterol from the foods you eat.

Your body needs some cholesterol. But if you have too much, it starts to build up in your arteries. (Arteries are the blood vessels that carry blood away from the heart.) This is called hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis. It is usually a slow process that gets worse as you get older.

To understand what happens, think about how a clog forms in the pipe under a kitchen sink. Like the buildup of grease in the pipe, the buildup of cholesterol narrows your arteries and makes it harder for blood to flow through them. It reduces the amount of blood that gets to your body tissues, including your heart. This can lead to serious problems, including heart attack and stroke.

A simple blood test tells you how much cholesterol you have. The test results are given in mg/dL of cholesterol but most people just say the numbers. Your cholesterol numbers help your doctor know your risk of heart attack. To know this risk, your doctor will also take into account other factors like your age, blood pressure, family history, and if you smoke.

For a general idea about your total cholesterol number, compare your number to the following:

Best is less than 200.
Borderline-high is 200 to 239.
High is 240 or above.
What are the symptoms?
High cholesterol doesn't make you feel sick. But if cholesterol builds up in your arteries, it can block blood flow to your heart or brain and cause a heart attack or stroke.

By the time you find out you have it, it may already be clogging your arteries. So it is very important to start treatment even though you may feel fine.

What are the different kinds of cholesterol?
Cholesterol travels through the blood attached to a protein. This package of cholesterol (a lipid) and protein is called a lipoprotein. Lipoproteins are either high-density or low-density, based on how much protein and fat they have.

Low-density lipoproteins (LDL) are the “bad” cholesterol. LDL is mostly fat with only a small amount of protein. It can clog your arteries. If you have high cholesterol, your doctor will want you to lower your LDL.
High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are the “good” cholesterol. HDL is more protein than fat. It helps clear the bad cholesterol from your blood so it does not clog your arteries. A high level of HDL can protect you from a heart attack.
Triglycerides are another type of fat in the blood that can affect your health. If you have high triglycerides and high LDL, your chances of having a heart attack are higher.
It may help to think of HDL as the “Healthy” cholesterol and LDL as the “Lousy” cholesterol. Or you could remember that HDL should be High and LDL should be Low.

Experts have come up with goals for each type of cholesterol. Your doctor will help you decide on cholesterol goals based on your risk of heart attack and stroke. Your doctor will help you know this risk. To find out your risk of a heart attack, you can use the Interactive Tool: Are You at Risk for a Heart Attack?

LDL should be low. Your LDL goal depends on your risk of heart attack and stroke. If you are at very high risk, your goal may be less than 70. If you are at high risk, your goal is less than 100. If you are at moderate risk, your goal is less than 130. If you are at low risk, your goal is less than 160.
HDL should be high. A good HDL goal is 40 or higher. HDL over 60 helps protect against a heart attack. HDL below 40 increases your risk of heart problems. A high HDL number can help offset a high LDL number.
Triglycerides should be less than 150. A level above 150 may increase your risk for heart problems.
Link: http://health.yahoo.com/cholesterol-overview/high-cholesterol/healthwise--hw115432.html
_________________
ChangeIsGood....Zaharah



Last edited by zaharah on Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:37 pm; edited 1 time in total

3 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:31 pm

zaharah

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What causes high cholesterol?
Many things can cause high cholesterol, including:

Diet. Eating too much saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol can raise your cholesterol. Saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol are in foods that come from animals (such as meats, whole milk, egg yolks, butter, and cheese), many packaged foods, and snack foods like cookies, crackers, and chips.
Weight. Being overweight may raise triglycerides and lower “good” HDL.
Activity level. Not exercising may raise “bad” LDL and lower HDL.
Overall health. Diseases such as hypothyroidism can raise cholesterol. Smoking may lower HDL.
Age. Cholesterol starts to rise after age 20. In men, it usually levels off after age 50. In women, it stays fairly low until menopause. After that, cholesterol levels rise to about the same levels as in men.
Family. Some people inherit a rare disease called a lipid disorder. It can cause very high total cholesterol, very low HDL, and high triglycerides. If you have this problem, you will need to start treatment at a young age.
How is high cholesterol diagnosed?
Doctors use a blood test to check cholesterol.

A fasting cholesterol test (also called a lipoprotein analysis) is the most complete test. It measures total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides. You cannot have food for 9 to 12 hours before this test.
A direct LDL test measures your LDL level only. You can have this test done at any time, even if you recently had a meal or snack.
A simple cholesterol test can measure total cholesterol and HDL. You can eat before this test. Sometimes doctors do this test first. If it shows you have high cholesterol or low HDL, then you will get a fasting cholesterol test.
How is it treated?
The two main treatments are lifestyle changes and medicines. The goal of treatment is to lower your "bad" LDL cholesterol and reduce your risk of a heart attack. You may also need to raise your "good" HDL cholesterol. A high level of HDL helps reduce your risk of heart problems.

Some lifestyle changes are important for everyone with high cholesterol. Your doctor will probably want you to:

Follow the Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes (TLC) diet. The goal is to reduce the amount of saturated fat you eat. Eating saturated fat raises your cholesterol. The TLC diet helps you learn to make better food choices by picking lean meats, low-fat or nonfat products, and good fats like olive and canola oils.
Lose weight, if you need to. Losing just 5 lb to 10 lb (2.3 kg to 4.5 kg) can lower your cholesterol and triglycerides. Losing weight can also help lower your blood pressure.
Be more active. Exercise can raise your “good” HDL and may help you control your weight.
Quit smoking, if you smoke. Quitting can help raise your HDL and improve your heart health.
Sometimes lifestyle changes are enough on their own. But if you try them for a few months and they don't lower your cholesterol enough, your doctor may prescribe a cholesterol-lowering medicine called a statin. You also may need medicines to lower triglycerides or raise HDL.

You may need to start taking medicine right away if your cholesterol is very high or if you have another problem that increases your chance of having a heart attack. People who have a high risk for heart attack benefit from taking higher doses of statins to lower their LDL cholesterol as much as possible. The more these people can lower their LDL, the less likely they are to have a heart attack.1 To find out your risk, use the Interactive Tool: Are You at Risk for a Heart Attack?

It is important to take your medicine just the way your doctor tells you to. If you stop taking your medicine, your cholesterol will go back up.

You will need to have your cholesterol checked regularly. Your results can help your doctor know if lifestyle changes have helped or if you need more or different medicines.

Link: http://health.yahoo.com/cholesterol-overview/high-cholesterol/healthwise--hw115432.html
_________________
ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

4 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:32 pm

zaharah

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Total cholesterol

Your total cholesterol level shows if your cholesterol is high or low. If you have high cholesterol, your doctor will want to know your LDL and HDL levels before deciding whether you need treatment and what sort of treatment you need.

Total cholesterol Best Less than 200
Borderline high 200 to 239
High 240 or above


LDL cholesterol

You want your LDL level to be low. But how low your LDL should be depends on your risk of heart attack. This table shows the LDL levels for someone with an average risk of heart attack. Your own LDL goal may change, based on your risk of heart attack. This risk is based on your age and on whether you smoke, have high blood pressure, have a low HDL level, have diabetes, or have one or more close relatives who have or had early coronary artery disease.

LDL (bad) cholesterol Best Below 100
Near best 100 to 129
Borderline high 130 to 159
High 160 to 189
Very high 190 and above

Your doctor will help decide what your LDL goal is and if you need any treatment to lower your LDL. The higher your risk of heart attack, the lower your LDL goal.

HDL cholesterol

You want your HDL level high. HDL (good) cholesterol goals are different for men and women. But for everyone, the higher your HDL, the better. HDL over 60 helps protect against a heart attack. HDL below 40 increases your risk of heart problems. A high HDL number can help offset a high LDL number.

HDL (good) cholesterol Best 60 or higher protects against heart disease
Good 40 or higher
Bad Below 40

Triglycerides

You want your triglyceride level to be low.

Triglyceride levels Normal Less than 150
Borderline-high 150 to 199
High 200 to 499
Very high 500 or higher

When you visit your doctor to talk about your cholesterol test, you will talk about other things that increase your risk for heart problems, such as smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, and a family history of high cholesterol and heart attack. Your doctor will use all of this information, along with your cholesterol numbers, to decide whether you need treatment and what type of treatment you need.

Your doctor will help you figure out your risk of heart attack or stroke. But you can check your own risk for a heart attack by using the Interactive Tool: Are You at Risk for a Heart Attack?

If you have a high risk of a heart attack, or if you already have heart problems, your doctor will be more likely to prescribe medicine along with lifestyle changes. For more information about heart disease, see the topic Coronary Artery Disease.

You may need other tests to determine whether another health problem, such as hypothyroidism, is causing your high cholesterol. Some medicines may also cause high cholesterol, so it is important to tell your doctor about everything you take.

If you have high cholesterol, your doctor may suggest that you get a test for diabetes.

A C-reactive protein (CRP) test may be done for some people who are at risk for getting coronary artery disease. A special type of CRP test, the high-sensitivity CRP test (hs-CRP), can help find out your chance of having a sudden heart problem, such as a heart attack. This test may be done even if you have a normal or low level of LDL cholesterol.

link: http://health.yahoo.com/cholesterol-overview/high-cholesterol/healthwise--hw115432.html
_________________
ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

5 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:33 pm

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6 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:36 pm

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11 Tips to Cut Your Cholesterol Fast
Got high cholesterol? Learn what you can do to lower it quickly -- starting today.

How's your cholesterol? If you think that the normal reading you got back in 2004 (or earlier) means you're in the clear, think again: Levels of the artery-clogging substance often rise with age, and cardiologists say everyone 20 or older should be screened for high cholesterol at least once every five years, with more frequent screenings for anyone deemed to be at high risk for heart disease. If it's been awhile since your last cholesterol screening, now's a good time to ask your doctor if you're due for one.

The good news? If your fasting total cholesterol level exceeds the desirable level of 200, or if your low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad”) cholesterol is above 100, getting it down to a safer level could be easier than you think. In fact, with simple lifestyle modifications -- and, if necessary, drug therapy -- people often see significant reductions in cholesterol within six weeks. Get going right now, and by New Year's Eve you could be toasting your cholesterol level rather than resolving to lower it.

Here are 11 tips from WebMD health experts on how to cut high cholesterol fast:

Get Your Personalized Cholesterol Health Assessment

1. Set a target.
You know you've got to get your cholesterol number down, but how low do you need to go? That depends on several factors, including your personal and family history of heart disease, as well as whether you have cardiovascular risk factors, such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and smoking.
If your risk is deemed high, "most doctors will treat for a target LDL of less than 70," says James Beckerman, MD, a cardiologist in private practice in Portland, Ore. If your risk is moderate, a target LDL of under 130 is generally OK, Beckerman says. If your risk is low, less than 160 is a reasonable target. "The trend now is to treat people earlier, especially if they have two or more risk factors," he says.

2. Consider medication.
Lifestyle modifications make sense for anyone with elevated cholesterol. But if your cardiovascular risk is high, you may also need to take a cholesterol-lowering drug. Michael Richman, MD, medical director of the Center for Cholesterol Management in Los Angeles, calls drug therapy "the only thing that will work fast" to lower high cholesterol. "Everyone should do the basics, like stopping smoking and losing weight," Richman tells WebMD. "But these things lower the risk only modestly. They're nothing to write home about."
Beckerman agrees. "Lifestyle modifications are important, but we should also be emphasizing the benefits of medication when appropriate," he says.
Several types of cholesterol-lowering medication are available, including niacin, bile acid resins, and fibrates. But statins are the treatment of choice for most individuals. "Statins can lower LDL cholesterol by 20% to 50%" says Pamela Peeke, MD, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.

3. Get moving. In addition to lowering LDL "bad" cholesterol, regular physical activity can raise HDL "good" cholesterol by up to 10%. The benefits come even with moderate exercise, such as brisk walking.
Robert Harrington, MD, professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, N.C., urges his patients to go for a 45-minute walk after supper.
Peeke tells WebMD, "I ask people to get a pedometer and aim for 10,000 steps a day. If you work at a desk, get up and walk around for five minutes every hour."
Whatever form your exercise takes, the key is to do it with regularity. "Some experts recommend seven days a week, although I think five days is more realistic," Richman says.

4. Avoid saturated fat. Doctors used to think that the key to lowering high cholesterol was to cut back on eggs and other cholesterol-rich foods. But now it's clear that dietary cholesterol isn't the main culprit. "Eggs don't do all that much [to raise cholesterol]," Beckerman says. "You don't want to be throwing down six eggs a day, but recent data suggest that it's really saturated fat" that causes increases in cholesterol. And if you cooked your eggs in a slab of butter, don't overlook the fat in the butter.
"One of the first things to do when you're trying to lower your cholesterol level is to take saturated fat down a few notches," says Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, the author of several nutrition books, including the forthcoming Tell Me What to Eat If I Have Heart Disease. "The second thing to do is to start eating more 'smart' fats," Magee says. She recommends substituting canola oil or olive oil for vegetable oil, butter, stick margarine, lard, or shortening while cutting back on meat and eating more fish.

5. Eat more fiber.
Fruits and vegetables, including whole grains, are good sources not only of heart-healthy antioxidants but also cholesterol-lowering dietary fiber. Soluble fiber, in particular, can help lower cholesterol. Beckerman says it "acts like a sponge to absorb cholesterol "in the digestive tract. Good sources of soluble fiber include dried beans, oats, and barley, as well as fiber products containing psyllium.

6. Go fish.
Fish and fish oil are chockablock with cholesterol-lowering omega-3 fatty acids. "Fish oil supplements can have a profound effect on cholesterol and triglycerides," Beckerman says. "There's a lot of scientific evidence to support their use." Fish oil is considered to be quite safe, but check with your doctor first if you are taking an anti-clotting medication.
Magee recommends eating fish two or three times a week. "Salmon is great, as it has lots of omega-3s,"she says. But even canned tuna has omega-3s, and it's more consumer-friendly. The American Heart Association also recommends fish as the preferable source of omega-3s, but fish oil capsule supplements can be considered after consultation with your physician. Plant sources of omega-3s include soybeans, canola, flaxseeds, walnuts, and their oils, but they don't provide the same omega-3s as fish. The biggest heart benefits have been linked to omega-3s found in fish.

8. Drink green.
Magee suggests green tea as a healthier alternative to sodas and sugary beverages. Indeed, research in both animals and humans has shown that green tea contains compounds that can help lower LDL cholesterol. In a small-scale study conducted recently in Brazil, people who took capsules containing a green tea extract experienced a 4.5% reduction in LDL cholesterol.

9. Eat nuts. Extensive research has demonstrated that regular consumption of nuts can bring modest reductions in cholesterol. Walnuts and almonds seem particularly beneficial. But nuts are high in calories, so limit yourself to a handful a day, experts say.

10. Switch spreads. Recent years have seen the introduction of margarine-like spreads and other foods fortified with cholesterol-lowering plant compounds known as stanols.



11. Don't smoke.
Smoking lowers levels of HDL "good" cholesterol and is a major risk factor for heart disease.
Link:
http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/features/11-tips-to-cut-your-cholesterol-fast
_________________
ChangeIsGood....Zaharah



Last edited by zaharah on Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:41 pm; edited 1 time in total

7 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:38 pm

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Herbal Medicines & Cholesterol: Part 1

Are They Safe? Do They Really Lower Cholesterol?

I originally posted on this topic in 2007 because I wanted to talk about the possible dangers associated with some “herbal” medicines, also know as nutraceuticals, and the research done on their possible cholesterol lowering effects. In the February 9th edition of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, there is a paper about the hidden dangers of these “herbal” medicines. They reviewed nearly 90 papers that have addressed herbal and complementary therapies and cardiovascular effects. They listed 15 common herbal medicines that are known to adverse interact with conventional cardiovascular medicines. Many patients, however, think that since these medicines are “natural” their dangers should not be considered in the same way as medications. The author found data from the 1990s suggesting that more patients consult complementary and alternative medicine providers than regular physicians. I have included other medicines and functional foods that are thought to have a cholesterol lowering effect in this review.

Grapefruit juice, for example, has a negative effect on an enzyme called CYP3A4 in the intestine, which can cause substantial elevations of the statin drugs lovastatin, simvistatin, and atorvastatin when taken simultaneously. An 8 ounce glass of grapefruit juice in the morning followed by an evening dose of statin produces only a modest increase in the amount of the drug in the body while a larger glass does produce a substantially larger effect.

At least 3 well-designed studies failed to document any influence of garlic on serum lipoproteins (the particles that carry the cholesterol). Garlic is one of several herbal remedies with specific cardiovascular effects in it’s own right. Garlic inhibits platelet clumping in the blood and thus lead to increased bleeding risks when taken with clopidogrel (Plavix), warfarin (Coumadin), and aspirin.

Guggulipids are found in the arid regions of India and Pakistan, and believed to be the active ingredients in the resin of the Commiphora Mukul “Guggul” tree. This substance is marketed in the US under the name “Guggulipids” as a dietary supplement and is promoted to control cholesterol. The gum resin of the Guggul tree has been used in Ayurveda for more than 2,000 years and is believed to have many health benefits including treating obesity.

Though there have been numerous studies evaluating the impact of guggul on lipids, these studies have concentrated on the Eastern Indian population. Of the two placebo controlled trials, the study performed in the Indian population found that guggulipids lowered LDL cholesterol by 12%. On the strength of this study, guggul was approved for use in India. A single study reported in the US was a carefully designed 8-week, double blind randomized, placebo-controlled trial using a parallel design. During this carefully controlled clinical trial, the Guggulipids did not lower LDL cholesterol and in fact actually increased LDL cholesterol in the majority of treated patients. Of some concern was the high rate of hypersensitivity rashes (9% of the participants). Interestingly, in both Indian and Western studies, there does appear to be some patients who did respond to Guggulipids. The percentage of people responding favorably in the Indian trials suggests that perhaps the Indian population may differ in some basic ways (genetically or environmentally) from the primarily Caucasian population.

Policosanol is a mixture of long-chain primary aliphatic alcohols isolated from sugarcane wax. Policosanol products can also be derived from wheat germ, rice bran and beeswax. The most widely available policosanol product comes from Cuba and is sold as a lipid-lowering product in over 40 countries. Until recently, a single Cuban research group performed nearly all studies conducted on policosanol. These Cuban studies show promise. However, with the recent publication of a number of negative studies outside of Cuba, the beneficial effects of policosanol have been called into question. Overall, recent placebo-controlled trials examining the lipid altering effects of sugarcane-derived policosanol failed to find any significant lipid-altering effects. At the present time, policosanol cannot be recommended for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

Is cinnamon safe? In 2003 an in-vivo study was concluded on 60 diabetic candidates in Pakistan. The results of this study were released to the Western media and a frenzy of cinnamon capsules were sold in the US and other countries promoting Cinnamon’s lipid lowering effects. Since that time, numerous studies in Germany and in the Netherlands have been published. The result of these studies differs significantly from the original Pakistani study. Based on the data from these studies, it would appear that the early enthusiasm for cinnamon supplementation might have been premature.

Last year I wrote a blog posting about the dangers of red yeast rice and I strongly encourage everyone to read it. I stated that there is a new compound from China that has been found called XYZ which has not been adequately studied and may pose a health risk. The official position of the National Lipid Association is to stay away from red yeast rice at the present time and I support their position. Red yeast rice is the fermented product of rice on which red yeast has been grown .The active ingredient in red yeast rice is believed to be Monacolin K, an agent reported to be identical to lovastatin (a commonly prescribed statin). Like statins, red yeast has been found to directly reduce lipids. There is little doubt that the proprietary preparation of red yeast rice, known as Cholestin favorably alters lipids.

However, due to legal issues, this preparation is no longer commercially available in the US. In 1998, the FDA determined that red yeast rice did not conform to the definition of a dietary supplement under the 1994 Diet Supplement and Health Education Act (DSHEA). This act states that marketed dietary supplements cannot contain a compound already approved as a drug (in this case, lovastatin) unless the substance was available commercially before the drug’s approval. At present, Cholestin is still available in Canada, Europe and Asia – however, great caution should be exercised because Cholestin has been reformulated and no longer contains the important red yeast rice extract, but rather polymethoxylated flavones extracted from citrus fruits, geraniol and marine fish oils. It is unclear if this or other proprietary preparations of” red yeast extract will provide the same lipid effects. The FDA has issued a warning to consumers regarding three brands of red yeast rice. For more information go to www.fda.gov and type “red yeast rice” in the s
earch box.

The FDA recommends that consumption of 1.5 ounces of nuts per day MAY reduce cardiovascular risk. Aside from the fatty acid composition of nuts, other components such as arginine, plant sterols, and phenolic components may play a favorable role in the lowering of lipid levels for those who eat nuts as a regular part of their diet. Walnuts and almonds have been most comprehensively studied. Most clinical trials evaluating the impact of nuts on lipid profiles have been small scale (10-49 participants). LDL-C (the bad cholesterol) reduction has been consistently shown in these small scale studies, typically in the range of 12-13%. Though less consistent, triglyceride reduction was shown. However, HDL-C (the good cholesterol) generally remained unchanged. One must always remember that these studies are far too small to establish any guidelines and there certainly is not one ounce of outcome data regarding the effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

The American Dietetics Association evidence library concludes that “consumption of 50-113 grams (1/2 cup to 1 cup) of nuts daily with a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol decreased total cholesterol by 4-21% and LDL-C by 6-29% when weight was not gained.” However, we have to remember that a diet rich in nuts is a heavy caloric load and may lead to weight gain. I recommend somewhat smaller portions of nuts as part of a healthful diet.

There are two kinds of fiber or nondigestible carbohydrates. The first, which is insoluble, aids in bowel function. An example is wheat bran. The second is soluble fiber, now referred to as viscous fiber, which has an additional cholesterol lowering effect. Examples include dried beans, grains, certain fruits and vegetables. Psyllium is a source of soluble fiber and has been shown to augment the lipid lowering response when combined with other lipid lowering medications. Oat products have the most soluble fiber of any grain. Several recent studies have looked specifically at the effects of oats or oat bran on LDL-C. Both oats and oat bran demonstrated favorable results in the lowering of LDL-C. Robitaille’s study on overweight pre-menopausal women provided 28 grams of oat bran daily over 4 weeks and not only obtained LDL-C reductions, but also demonstrated an 11.2% increase in HDL-C. In moderately hypercholesterolemic men and women, a study found significant positive results from the consumption of barley. A reduction of 20% in total cholesterol and 24% in LDL-C was obtained in 1 study.

The ATP III (Adult Treatment Panel) recommends a minimum of 5-10 grams a day of total dietary fiber for people with even mildly elevated LDL-C levels, but higher intakes of 10-12 grams of fiber per day can be more beneficial in those with more severe hyperlipidemia.

In large prospective epidemiological studies, total dietary fiber has been shown to protect against coronary heart disease. These studies examined the relationship between whole grain consumption and CHD. Researchers found 20-40% reduction in CHD risk for those who habitually consumed whole grains as compared to those who rarely ate whole grains. There are several mechanisms by which it is believed dietary fiber may protect against CHD. They include lowering serum cholesterol and LDL-C, attenuating blood triglyceride levels, and decreasing hypertension. Fiber consumption also predicts insulin levels and weight gain more strongly than a low total fat and saturated fat diet. High fiber diets may protect against obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) by lowering insulin levels. It has been shown that the intake of dietary fiber is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk factors in both sexes.

However, most of the evidence shows that a mixture of both soluble and insoluble forms of fiber is an important part of a diet that promotes general good cardiovascular health. Based upon this conclusion, the National Academy of Science recommends 25 grams per day of fiber for women 19-50 years of age and 21 grams per day for women over 50. For men 19-50 years of age, 38 grams per day is recommended and 30 grams for men over 50. This is set from an established 14 grams of fiber per 1,000 calories.

In the last 12 years, soy has been believed to lower LDL-C. However, recent data has not shown soy to be a practical means to lower LDL-C. In order to achieve any meaningful LDL-C reduction, large amounts of soy are required. Even when individuals consume half their daily protein with soy protein only a very small reduction (3%) in LDL-C is achieved. Soy seems to be a more efficacious lipid-lowering agent in persons with marked hyperlipidemia. It should be noted that reduction in lipids may be due to replacing high-fat animal protein with soy rich foods that may indirectly result in lipid reduction via a reduction in saturated fat intake.

Lecithin is another widely promoted lipid-lowering functional food that is derived from soy beans and sold as a “fat emulsifier”. Many people believe that this “emulsifier” actually breaks down fat and cholesterol in the bloodstream. These claims are totally unsubstantiated by any medical literature.

Another promoted cholesterol lowering remedy is daily a dose of apple cider vinegar. To date, I have yet to see substantial evidence in the form of any clinical trial evidence that supports these claims.

I have tried to shed some light on the most common nutraceuticals that are promoted to lower lipid levels. I have used solid, evidence-based studies to provide the latest, most accurate information. Perhaps you have found studies on the Internet to support the claims that many of these functional foods will lower cholesterol levels. I would like to bring three important points to your attention.

First, it is important to remember that most of consumer-based literature published has no or little scientific components and are purely retrospective data gathered via questionnaires. Remember, any one can write a paper on any topic and get in published in some type of journal but I can guarantee that none of these journals are “peer review” journals.

Second, the nutraceutical industry is unregulated. Although Congress is once again calling on this industry to be regulated, nothing will probably be done. It is possible for companies promoting functional foods to fund a study that is designed to show the favorable results they had planned on prior to construction of the study.

Finally, what is most important is outcome data. This simply means, as a result of the drug or supplement’s effect on lipid levels, did that substance affect change that resulted in fewer cardiovascular events and death?
As a cholesterol expert, I fully believe it is important to lower cholesterol by any means necessary. My greatest concern for patients and consumers regards the safety of many of the supplements we have discussed. Simply stated, they have not been well studied. Be an informed patient! When taking any substance, caution should always be exercised. There are many drug interactions with over-the-counter supplements, vitamins and other nutraceuticals and a medical professional well-versed in lipid
management should be consulted before considering any drug or non-drug protocol. A medical professional well-versed in lipid management should be consulted before considering using any type of medicine to lower cholesterol.

- Michael Richman, MD, FACS

Get Cholesterol Management tips in your inbox.

Link: WebMd.com
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ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

8 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:39 pm

zaharah

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High-Sugar Diet Linked to Cholesterol
Added Sugars in Diet Triple Risk of Having Low Level of 'Good' Cholesterol.



April 20, 2010 -- The average American eats the equivalent of about 21 teaspoons of added sugar a day -- about 2 1/2 to 3 times more than new heart disease prevention guidelines say they should.

Excess sugar is known to contribute to obesity, diabetes, and other conditions linked to heart disease, and now new research links it to unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

People in the study who ate the most added sugar had the lowest HDL, or good cholesterol, and the highest blood triglyceride levels. People who ate the least sugar had the highest HDL and the lowest triglyceride levels.

Eating large amounts of added sugar more than tripled the risk of having low HDL, which is a major risk factor for heart disease.

The study appears in this week’s issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Added Sugar, Empty Calories
Added sugar is defined as any caloric sweetener used in processed or prepared foods. Beyond increasing calories, added sugars have no nutritional value.

In guidelines released late last summer, the American Heart Association recommended limiting added sugar in the diet to no more than 100 calories a day for most women and 150 calories for most men.

That’s about 6 teaspoons of sugar a day for women and 9 teaspoons for men.

To put this in perspective, the average 12-ounce can of regular soda has between 8 and 10 teaspoons of sugar. A breakfast cereal with 16 grams of sugar per serving has about 4 teaspoons.

In the newly published study, daily consumption of added sugars averaged about 360 calories a day, or 16% of total daily calories.

That is an increase of about 6% in just over three decades, researcher Miriam Vos, MD, of Atlanta’s Emory University tells WebMD.

“This is a dramatic increase, but it is not too surprising given the proliferation of processed foods with large amounts of added sugar,” she says.

Vos and colleagues analyzed data on 6,113 adults who participated in the large, ongoing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 to 2006.

The lowest consumption group got less than 5% of their daily calories from added sugars, while the highest consumers got 25% or more of their daily calories from sugar.

Sugar consumption appeared to be directly related to HDL and triglyceride levels. The more sugar the participants ate, the lower their HDL and higher their triglycerides.

Compared to people who ate the least sugar, people who ate the most sugar were three times more likely to have low HDL levels.

“Our findings strongly support the AHA recommendations to limit added sugar,” Vos says.

Sugar Hiding in Drinks, Processed Foods
University of Vermont nutrition professor Rachel K. Johnson, PhD, the author of the AHA sugar guidelines, says only a small minority of Americans meet the goal of eating no more than 100 to 150 calories a day of added sugar.

Reading food labels can help, but because labels don’t distinguish between added sugars and those that occur naturally in foods like fruits, vegetables, and dairy products, they can be misleading, she says.

“When a label has the word ‘syrup’ or words that end in ‘ose’ like sucrose, fructose, and dextrose, these are added sugars,” she says. Another ingredient that represents added sugar is “evaporated cane juice.”

Johnson says anyone who wants to limit the sugar in their diet should start by examining what they drink.

“We know that beverages are the No. 1 source of added sugar in the diet, and we aren’t just talking about soft drinks,” she says. “Most fruit drinks and sports drinks are full of added sugar.”

Eating fewer processed foods is also key, she says.

“The old mantra to shop the perimeter of the grocery store is as true today as it ever was,” she says. “A diet based of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy, and lean meats will be low in added sugars.”

Link: WebMd.com
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ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

9 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:40 pm

zaharah

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Olive Oil Especially Protective in People with High Cholesterol

A variation on the above study also shows that including some extra virgin olive oil (which is rich in clot-fighting phenols) in your meals may help prevent the formation of blood clots, an occurrence whose likelihood increases after eating, particularly in people with high cholesterol.

In the early stages of atherosclerosis, the balance between clot-promoting and clot-dissolving factors in the blood vessels shifts in favor of clot formation, a situation made even more dangerous by the high levels of fat that can appear in the blood after a meal.

Researchers had 21 people with high cholesterol eat two different breakfasts. For one week, they consumed either white bread with virgin olive oil containing 400 parts per million phenols, or white bread with olive oil from which much of the phenols had been extracted, leaving only 80 parts per million. Study participants then switched to the opposite meal. After the high-phenol olive oil meal, participants' concentrations of two clot promoters, factor VII antigen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, were much lower compared to the low-phenol olive oil meal. (Ruano J, Lopez-Miranda J, et al., Am J Clin Nutr.) http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=132
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ChangeIsGood....Zaharah



Last edited by zaharah on Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:44 pm; edited 1 time in total

10 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:47 pm

zaharah

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Effect of Dietary Fats on Cholesterol Levels
Fat Found in State at Room Temperature Effect on Cholesterol Levels


Monounsaturated- Olives; olive oil, canola oil, peanut oil; cashews, almonds, peanuts, and most other nuts; avocados Liquid Lowers LDL; raises HDL

Polyunsaturated- Corn, soybean, safflower, and cottonseed oils; fish Liquid Lowers both LDL and HDL

Saturated -Whole milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream; red meat; chocolate; coconut milk, and coconut oil Solid Raises both LDL and HDL

Trans- Most margarines; vegetable shortening; partially hydrogenated vegetable oil; deep-fried chips; many fast foods; most commercial baked goods Solid or
semi-solid Raises LDL; lowers HDL

Link: http://www.explorecrete.com/nature/olive-oil-health-benefits.html
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11 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:48 pm

zaharah

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Eating Nuts Daily Lowers Cholesterol
Daily Helping of Nuts May Help Fight Heart Disease, New Study Finds
By Bill Hendrick
WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Elizabeth Klodas, MD, FACCMay 10, 2010 -- Eating nuts on a daily basis improves blood cholesterol levels and reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, a new study says.

Joan Sabaté, MD, DrPH, and colleagues from Loma Linda University in California, pooled data from 25 studies on nut consumption in seven countries, looking at 583 men and women with various cholesterol levels. None was on cholesterol-lowering medications. Nuts evaluated included almonds, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, macadamia nuts, and peanuts.

Patients in the trials ate an average of 67 grams, or about 2.4 ounces, of nuts daily.

This dietary practice resulted in an average 5.1% reduction in total cholesterol concentration, a 7.4% reduction in LDL or bad cholesterol, and an 8.3% reduction in the ratio of LDL to HDL (“good” cholesterol) levels.

In addition, triglyceride measurements declined by 10.2%, but only among people with initially elevated triglyceride readings. The cholesterol effects of nut consumption were similar in men and women, and were dose related.


Nuts Improve Cholesterol, Heart Health
Different types of nuts had similar effects on blood cholesterol levels, according to the authors. However, “effects of nut consumption were significantly modified by LDL, body mass index, and diet type: the lipid-lowering effects of nut consumption were greatest among subjects with high baseline LDL and with low body mass index and among those consuming Western diets.”

The findings support the inclusion of nuts in therapeutic dietary interventions for improving cholesterol levels, the authors say.

“Increasing consumption of nuts as part of an otherwise prudent diet can be expected to favorably affect blood lipid levels (at least in the short term), and have the potential to lower coronary heart disease risk,” the authors write.

Nevertheless, moderation is key. Although eating nuts on a regular basis appears to have significant health benefits, nut consumption should be limited to no more than 3 ounces per day because of their high calorie density.

Sabaté and fellow author Emilio Ros, MD, PhD, disclose receiving research funding from the California Walnut Commission, the Almond Board of California, the National Peanut Board, and the International Tree Nut Council. Sabaté has also received an honorarium as a member of the Pistachio Scientific Advisory Board.

The study is published in the May 10 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

Link: http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20100510/eating-nuts-daily-lowers-cholesterol?ecd=wnl_hbn_051710
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ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

12 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:49 pm

zaharah

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Click link below to begin your personalized cholesterol health assessment from WebMD

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/cholesterol-health-check/default.htm?ecd=wnl_wlw_051510
_________________
ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

13 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:50 pm

zaharah

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Cholesterol Control
A group of researchers in Japan decided to examine the effects of Royal Jelly on blood cholesterol levels in 15 volunteers.
They gave half the volunteers 6 grams of Royal Jelly per day for 4 weeks. Those taking the RJ saw their total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) decreased significantly compared with those who didn't get the RJ. HDL (the good cholesterol) levels didn't change in either group, nor did triglyceride levels.

So, it appears that Royal Jelly lowers bad cholesterol and total cholesterol while not harming good cholesterol levels. Amazing!
If your doctor is telling you to get your cholesterol levels down, perhaps Royal Jelly is a safer, natural option for you.

See our post on the Health Benefits of Royal Jelly and Bee Pollen
under Health/Wellness

Link: http://www.bee-pollen-buzz.com/health-benefits-of-royal-jelly.html
_________________
ChangeIsGood....Zaharah



Last edited by zaharah on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:52 pm; edited 1 time in total

14 Jasmine Tea on Wed Sep 01, 2010 10:51 pm

zaharah

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Jasmine tea is actually a combination of Chinese green tea with the additional flavor and aroma of jasmine flower petals. The jasmine petals are used at full bloom which occurs at night (after they are picked during the day), and the tea is made by repeatedly laying layers of jasmine petals and tea leaves over each other. Six layers of alternating leaves and petals effectively merge the scent of the jasmine flower to the green tea. After this "scenting" process is finished, the petals are removed for the tea leaves to be dried. The quality of jasmine tea is determined by the strength of the green tea base to absorb the scent of the flower. As far as health benefits, many believe that jasmine tea's benefits may exceed those of green tea. Some possible benefits additional to the antioxidant qualities of the green tea leaves are that jasmine tea may prolong life expectancy and lower cholesterol levels. Often jasmine tea leaves are rolled into balls which are called jasmine pearls.
Link: www.theteafarm.com/tea_jasmine.asp
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ChangeIsGood....Zaharah



Last edited by zaharah on Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:47 pm; edited 1 time in total

15 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:33 pm

zaharah

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Eating Nuts Daily Lowers Cholesterol

Daily Helping of Nuts May Help Fight Heart Disease, New Study Finds
By Bill Hendrick
WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Elizabeth Klodas, MD, FACCMay 10, 2010 -- Eating nuts on a daily basis improves blood cholesterol levels and reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, a new study says.

Joan Sabaté, MD, DrPH, and colleagues from Loma Linda University in California, pooled data from 25 studies on nut consumption in seven countries, looking at 583 men and women with various cholesterol levels. None was on cholesterol-lowering medications. Nuts evaluated included almonds, hazelnuts, pecans, pistachios, walnuts, macadamia nuts, and peanuts.

Patients in the trials ate an average of 67 grams, or about 2.4 ounces, of nuts daily.

This dietary practice resulted in an average 5.1% reduction in total cholesterol concentration, a 7.4% reduction in LDL or bad cholesterol, and an 8.3% reduction in the ratio of LDL to HDL (“good” cholesterol) levels.

In addition, triglyceride measurements declined by 10.2%, but only among people with initially elevated triglyceride readings. The cholesterol effects of nut consumption were similar in men and women, and were dose related.

Nuts Improve Cholesterol, Heart Health
Different types of nuts had similar effects on blood cholesterol levels, according to the authors. However, “effects of nut consumption were significantly modified by LDL, body mass index, and diet type: the lipid-lowering effects of nut consumption were greatest among subjects with high baseline LDL and with low body mass index and among those consuming Western diets.”

The findings support the inclusion of nuts in therapeutic dietary interventions for improving cholesterol levels, the authors say.

“Increasing consumption of nuts as part of an otherwise prudent diet can be expected to favorably affect blood lipid levels (at least in the short term), and have the potential to lower coronary heart disease risk,” the authors write.

Nevertheless, moderation is key. Although eating nuts on a regular basis appears to have significant health benefits, nut consumption should be limited to no more than 3 ounces per day because of their high calorie density.

Sabaté and fellow author Emilio Ros, MD, PhD, disclose receiving research funding from the California Walnut Commission, the Almond Board of California, the National Peanut Board, and the International Tree Nut Council. Sabaté has also received an honorarium as a member of the Pistachio Scientific Advisory Board.

The study is published in the May 10 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.
Link: http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20100510/eating-nuts-daily-lowers-cholesterol?ecd=wnl_hbn_051710
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16 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:35 pm

zaharah

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Pistachio Nuts May Lower Cholesterol
Antioxidant-Rich Pistachio Nuts Good for the Heart, Researchers Say
By Bill Hendrick
WebMD Health NewsReviewed by Laura J. Martin, MDMay 20, 2010 -- Long a staple of diets in the Mideast and around the Mediterranean, pistachio nuts may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, in part by decreasing cholesterol levels, a new study says.

Researchers say that pistachios are packed with antioxidants and are rich in several vitamins and minerals, such as selenium and iron, and also have healthy fats.

Penny Kris-Etherton, PhD, ND, of Pennsylvania State University’s Department of Nutritional Sciences, and colleagues, recruited 10 men and 18 women, all healthy nonsmokers, to eat the nuts.

They found that eating pistachios increased antioxidant levels in adults with high cholesterol.

“Our previous study showed the benefits of pistachios in lowering lipids and liproproteins, which are a risk factor for heart disease,” Kris-Etherton, a professor of nutrition, says in a news release. “This new study shows an additional effect of pistachios, so now there are multiple health benefits of eating pistachios.”

The little morsels also are high in antioxidants lutein, beta-carotene, and gamma-tocopherol, compared to other nuts. Beta-carotene is the precursor to vitamin A. Gamma-tocopherol is a form of vitamin E. Lutein is found in dark green leafy vegetables and is important in vision and skin health.

The Benefits of Pistachios
The researchers say antioxidants are of interest because oxidized low-density lipoproteins, known as LDL or “bad” cholesterol, have been implicated in inflammation and plaque buildup inside blood vessels.

Antioxidants should prevent LDL from oxidizing, migrating into the blood vessel walls, and causing inflammation, a Penn State news release says.

“Currently, studies on antioxidants do not show major benefits,” Kris-Etherton says. “Maybe we are not studying people long enough. Maybe there is something in the food that travels with the antioxidants. The antioxidant story is very disappointing to the scientific community.”

That’s the case because studies on specific antioxidants have not shown health benefits. However, she says epidemiological studies do seem to suggest benefits.

She and her research team conducted a randomized, controlled feeding experiment to test the effects of eating pistachios on antioxidant levels when added to a healthy diet.

The participants began by eating a diet of 35% total fat and 11% saturated fat for two weeks -- what the scientists described as typically American. Later, they tested three diets for four weeks each, with about a two-week break between each one. The diets included one with no pistachios and about 25% total fat and 8% saturated fat, a diet with 10% of calories from pistachios, and a diet with 20% of calories from pistachios.

The diets with pistachios produced higher blood levels of beta-carotene, lutein, and gamma-tocopherol than the diet without pistachios. The pistachio-enriched diets also produced lower oxidized concentrations of LDL cholesterol.

The results, Kris-Etherton says, suggest that “a heart healthy diet including pistachios contributes to a decrease in serum oxidized-LDL levels, in part through cholesterol lowering, and also due to an added benefit of the antioxidants in the pistachios.”

The study is published in the June 2010 issue of The Journal of Nutrition
http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20100520/pistachio-nut-good-for-your-heart?ecd=wnl_wmh_053110
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ChangeIsGood....Zaharah

17 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sun Sep 19, 2010 2:22 pm

zaharah

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Lowers LDL (bad) Cholesterol: Ginger root extract can help reduce the levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol in the body, reducing the risk of developing heart disease.


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18 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sat Jun 11, 2011 10:52 am

nazleen


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There are 2 types of cholesterol known to us : Bad & Good cholesterol which in medical terms are Saturated & Unsaturated.

One good way of lowering our blood cholesterol level is to have set a diet rich in cellulose. This mainly consists of leafy vegetables.
This might be strange to some, but scientists have come up with 'cellulose tablets' to aid people who are still stuck with cholesterol or 'the rich food' people.

19 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sat Jun 11, 2011 3:02 pm

zaharah

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Mashallah sister thanks for this information. I read this below about them
It helps reduce blood cholesterol level because they absorb water after entering the intestines and produce jelly like substances that work as sponge. They first enclose cholesterol and steroids, and then remove them from the body through defecation.


http://budimans.net/Tianshi07DoubleCelluloseTablets.htm


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20 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:44 am

nazleen


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All-Star Member
Thats true indeed.
The cellulose tablets help in that very function you mentioned.

Whoever wants to find out their blood cholesterol levels, please do check with a serum test.
You might find wonders hard to believe.

However, i prefer the real vegetables rich in cellulose to the pharmaceutical cellulose tablets.
God knows what else they have invested in those tablets,which may produce side effects.
But do keep in mind, excess consumption of vegetables, be it green or leafy, may lead to the blood disorder which we all know as leukemia.
You've all been warned.

Thank you.

21 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sun Jun 19, 2011 4:13 pm

Aisha

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Hey thanks sister's for this information. I have heard of those tablets before and sister Nazleen I prefere as you to eat the vegg's cause you are so right about no telling what they add to the tablets. This world today is so used to the quick way or should I say the microwave way of life.

22 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:08 pm

zaharah

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Sister Nazleen stated:
check with a serum test.

What Is Serum?

Serum consists of the liquid component of blood. Serum can be derived by taking whole blood and then modifying it. This modification involves taking out the blood cells via centrifugation. The term "serum" is derived from Latin, and can refer to many types of fluids, including that which is found in blisters as well as other compounds of medical relevance.

Identification




  • Serum, in the most commonly used definition, is the liquid part of blood. Blood is composed of two parts: the liquid portion, which contains proteins, minerals and other factors essential for clotting, and the blood cells. The blood cells are a mixture of red blood cells, which carry oxygen around the body, and white blood cells, which are a critical part of the immune system.


Features




  • Serum can be extracted from whole blood via centrifugation. Centrifugation is a physical process in which the material is spun around, circularly, at a high velocity. Centrifugation separates out materials in a solution via density. More dense materials are moved, via the centrifugal momentum, to the bottom of the container. In the case of blood, the cellular materials, being more dense, are propelled to the bottom, allowing for the extraction of the cell-free serum.


Features




  • Serum is blood plasma without any clotting factors. Plasma is the liquid component of blood and is 90 percent water. It contains dissolved proteins, minerals and dissolved carbon dioxide. After whole blood is centrifuged, the plasma can be drawn or poured off.




Alhamdulillah Sister Nazleen for helping to bring out this great point that we may discuss the importance of the Serum and its functions

http://www.ehow.com/about_4673561_what-is-serum.html


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23 Re: Lowering Cholesterol on Fri Oct 05, 2012 1:00 pm

nazleen


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Thank you sister. Very interesting article. Certainly it will benefit all of us here.



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